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LCC (Episode 49): Roger Dickerman And Emily Maguire Take On NYC Soda Ban & More!

“LOW-CARB CONVERSATIONS” PODCAST IS NOW LISTENER-SUPPORTED!

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In Episode 49 of “Low-Carb Conversations With Jimmy Moore & Friends,” we’ve got a fabulous show in store for you as Mindy Noxon Iannotti and I are rockin’ it with two more fabulous friends to share with you today. If you missed the BIG NEWS last week that we’ve decided to go to a LISTENER-SUPPORTED format with this podcast, then I wanted to invite you to make a donation to help keep this show on the air. We were absolutely blown away by the outpouring of love and financial support this past week after making this announcement on the previous episode and we are so grateful to each and every one of our incredible listeners who have told us how much this podcast means to them in their low-carb journey. THANK YOU from the bottom of our hearts for helping us continue providing new episodes of “Low-Carb Conversations” in the months and years to come and we’ve got another spectacular hour-long episode to share with you today!

We feature a Philadelphia, PA-based Paleo fitness expert named Roger Dickerman (who I met in person at PaleoFX in March) from Relentless Fitness (and the all-new “Relentless Roger And The Caveman Doctor” podcast) and the Senior Nutritionist at the UK-based low-carb GoLower company Emily Maguire who works with the incredible low-carb advocate Hannah Sutter who I’ve interviewed previously on “The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show.” Listen in as our prestigious panel chimes in on the recent sugary soda ban in New York City, a new study that says being obese doesn’t necessarily mean you have heart health risks, a history lesson on how highly-processed omega-6-rich vegetable oils replaced natural animal fats, whether too much Vitamin D can be as problematic as too little, and the notion that once you’ve been fat people will always look at you as being fat. It’s a full slate of interesting topics for you today, so sit back, relax and enjoy the conversation!

NOTE: Apologies for the “rumble” during this podcast. We had a poor Skype connection with one of our guests. THANK YOU for your understanding!

Listen to Roger Dickerman and Emily Maguire share today:

  • An update on my nutritional ketosis experience
  • Roger had an “unorthodox” background as a kid
  • He was “a little chubby around the edges”
  • After working on Wall Street, he wanted to make a change
  • He discovered a passion for health and started his business
  • The Relentless Transformation is what this is about
  • He just kind of “stumbled” on to Paleo
  • The amazing success he has seen with one of his clients
  • Paleo, smart exercise, empowerment and morphing your lifestyle
  • Emily studied nutrition and went to work for Hannah Sutter
  • The lack of real education about good nutrition health
  • Roger says clients aren’t necessarily ready to hear Paleo yet
  • Once you get the people on the plan, they become believers
  • “Bloomberg’s Nannyville: Do Big Soda Ban’s Benefits Exceed its Costs?”
  • Mindy says this leads to a “slippery slope” with other foods
  • Mayor Michael Bloomberg should “get the heck out of my kitchen”
  • It’s “putting a Band-aid” on the real problem
  • Emily says there are taxes on fat happening in Europe
  • Having other bad foods available for purchase is “ludicrous”
  • Roger’s “villain” opinion–he supports Bloomberg’s position
  • The small cup of coffee he received while visiting Japan
  • When you get a big cup, the inclination is to “drink it all”
  • It’s a “dangerous” expectation to drink more than needed
  • Jurassic Park brought us Dino-size meals at McDonald’s
  • They converted this over to a super-size with great success
  • Mindy’s shock at the amount of sugar in milkshakes at McD’s
  • It’s concerning to have the government involved in this
  • What if next time the government says fat is the problem?
  • Roger hopes it brings more attention to the “dangers of sugar”
  • He’s hopeful this leads to greater public education on health
  • Dr. Robert Lustig’s recent appearance on “60 Minutes”
  • Even people on a SAD diet know that sugar is bad for them
  • “Obesity not always tied to higher heart risk: study”
  • Emily says you can be obese and healthy or lean and unhealthy
  • Thin people don’t get a free pass on their health
  • What this highlights is the other health concerns for the obese
  • Roger’s concern this will “empower” people with unhealthy habits
  • The BMI is “completely broken” because it’s not accurate
  • The “skinny fat” clients he sees that look healthy but aren’t
  • He will “use everything” to measure the progress of his clients
  • Why he encourages his clients to get blood work done
  • What Dr. Mary Vernon describes as metabolically-obese normal weight
  • My 16-year old neighbor kid who’s skinny and eats whatever
  • Look at a skinny kid’s mom to see where they’re headed
  • “How Vegetable Oils Replaced Animal Fats in the American Diet”
  • Roger said reading this was “scary” and “a horror story”
  • He says people need to “think for yourself” and choose well
  • The modern parallel is the supplement industry
  • He questions the need for supplements if you have a good diet
  • Emily says they have a similar product in the UK
  • The marketing of products like Crisco is egregious
  • Getting “around the claims” in advertising of kid’s cereals
  • Promoting the so-called healthy ingredients in horrible foods
  • Food manufacturers want to “make a profit,” not help health
  • Butter/lard people were likely farmers and couldn’t fight it
  • This Crisco story reminded Mindy of the fluoride story
  • We all used to use Crisco in baking growing up
  • Roger says what you cook things in matters as much as the food
  • They came out with a butter-flavored Crisco product
  • Mindy said they even had a peanut butter-flavored Crisco too
  • The scene in the movie The Help talking about Crisco
  • “Too Much Vitamin D Can Be as Unhealthy as Too Little, Study Suggests”
  • Christine’s high Vitamin D level but not as high as this study
  • Roger’s concern about people supplementing Vitamin D blindly
  • We need to know the “triggers and causes” about why it’s high
  • Emily says a lot of people in the UK take it blindly
  • Why they don’t necessarily recommend people take Vitamin D
  • The poor sunlight in Scotland makes Vitamin D tough to get
  • She definitely wants to see some follow-up on this
  • It would have been nice to see worldwide Vitamin D samples
  • Mindy living in the Northeast has to supplement year-round
  • Make sure you are monitoring your levels closely
  • Roger says if a practitioner recommends Vitamin D, then take it
  • The “more is better” mentality that people tend to think
  • “No Matter How Much Weight You Lose, Everyone Will Still Think You’re Fat”
  • Why it’s difficult to get a mentality that you’re no longer fat
  • Mindy says women can be “vain” and the “jealousy factor” happens
  • When your goal becomes health-oriented, you’ll be happier
  • The fear of gaining back that people have with weight loss
  • Emily says psychology plays as much of a role as physiology
  • Roger says The Biggest Loser is “making it tough”
  • Mass media makes it look like it’s “easy to lose” weight
  • Do it for you, do it for your health, do it for your loved ones
  • These are “internal motivating factors,” not external
  • Trying to “stick it to them” will not last very long
  • Roger loves Meat Lovers Pizza with Cauliflower Crust
  • His use of “spiced up chicken” as a topping
  • Mindy says there’s some trial and error making this recipe
  • She says it’s “a pretty good substitute” for pizza
  • Emily’s ground almonds recipe to make a good pizza crust
  • The popular Paleo-friendly Meatza pizza recipe
  • Don’t forget to support this show: DONATE HERE!

    There are three ways you can listen to Episode 49:

    1. Listen at the iTunes page for the podcast:

    2. Listen and comment about the show at the official web site for the podcast:

    3. Download the MP3 file of Episode 49 [55:16m]:

    Today we heard from Roger Dickerman and Emily Maguire sharing their opinions about “Bloomberg’s Nannyville: Do Big Soda Ban’s Benefits Exceed its Costs?,” “Obesity not always tied to higher heart risk: study,” “How Vegetable Oils Replaced Animal Fats in the American Diet,” “Too Much Vitamin D Can Be as Unhealthy as Too Little, Study Suggests,” “No Matter How Much Weight You Lose, Everyone Will Still Think You’re Fat,” and so much more! Give us feedback about what you heard in today’s show in the show notes section of Episode 49. Coming up next Friday in Episode 50 on June 22, 2012 we’ll welcome Mark Siegrist from the “Low Carb Learning” blog and registered dietitian Cassie Bjork sharing from their personal and professional low-carb experiences.

    If YOU want to be on a future episode of “Low-Carb Conversations with Jimmy Moore & Friends” then simply e-mail your Skype username to livinlowcarbman@charter.net. When we’re getting set to record new episodes and I’m ready to use you, then I’ll be in touch. Do you have something to share about what you heard on “Low-Carb Conversations With Jimmy Moore & Friends?” Drop us an e-mail anytime at lowcarbconversations@gmail.com. Tell us your comments about the show, ask any questions you may have for our friends to talk about, pass along your ideas for what you’d like to hear discussed, and let us know if you have any other suggestions about how we can improve YOUR show. THANKS for joining us in the conversation and we’ll talk with you about healthy low-carb living again next Friday. THANK YOU again for making a donation to this listener-supported podcast and leaving us a review on iTunes. YOU GUYS ROCK!

    • If you ask me, that study just confirms that the things the cause obesity are the same things that cause heart disease, CVD, stroke, and all the other problems, and while some people show symptoms of heart disease AND obesity, some show just obesity and others show just heart disease.  High cholesterol’s link is a correlation, at best, and not a causation.